Posts Tagged ‘indepenedent contractor dog grooming’

A Bully is Obsessed With Me Because I Refused to Make Him Money

August 11, 2017

I am starting this blog post with a story many of us have heard about.  Mike “Lock her up!” Flynn, ranting about Hilary Clinton,  a Trump toadie, spread the Alex Jones rumor that Cosmic Pizza in Washington, DC—a family owned business…was a headquarters for Hilary Clinton’s pedophile ring.  Laughable? A guy went  in there with a rifle and shot the place up. Almost ruined a family business.  Not illegal.  I am sure the  business owner has a lawyer, but you have to wonder how often an asshole sets out to destroy a business  just because he can.

I am finding more and more dog groomers report being bullied by men. Same story I am going to report. they post fake reviews, they call and harass businesses…or make  fake appointments.  it’s not illegal to be an asshole.

I  started blogging about 10 years ago because I had a lot to say about a variety of subjects, but mostly… to expound on my experiences with dogs.  Due to a  bad economy, as well as a bullying boss , I was adrift for a couple of years. Yet…I never went into debt.  I  paid my mortgage—was able ultimately to REFINANCE my  mortgage, and look forward to retiring in about  two years.  From grooming dogs.

The bullying boss was never fired, but when the company (12 kennels is a company) was sold, he was demoted to kennel staff & moved to another location,  However…between (among) him, some people he had contact with (a guy with a dick & balls will always have more credibility than a woman), and a guy I refused to work for….as well as  people who say they love dogs—but have never actually trained a dog,  learned anything about animal husbandry, and  other dynamics  with integrity, problems remain.

This is the blog I posted: https://disparateinterests.wordpress.com/2010/06/23/are-you-looking-for-a-dog-grooming-job-in-chicago/     I interviewed  with Dan London, who told me his  dog experience came from walking dogs in a kennel.  He apparently either inherited money or got a structured settlement, and opened  a grooming shop…sort of. He paid to have bath tubs installed, had a portable grooming table, and  a ‘force’ dog dryer, but  not enough professional equipment. At the time–this was around 2008 or so, I had  several clients with long haired dogs which I groomed every week or every 2 weeks.  I knew I would have to move equipment in.  He  said he and his partner wanted to hire me…but they would set the prices. I told him that wouldn’t work.  My prices are my prices,.  He asked why, and I said, “You just don’t have enough dog experience.”

Again…what he had was bullying & internet experience.   I was looking for part time work, and  I inadvertently responded to a blind ad he ran. I learned not to do that, but he called and harassed all the groomers I worked for and posted fake Yelp! reviews.  My very favorite?  “I was being given a tour of (x shop) & I saw ROBYN MICHAELS beat a dog that urinated on her table.”

Of course, that never  happened.  I worked for  Pardise4Paws for  about two years.  Where I work in a kennel, I don’t have a phone.  That’s just how it is. You leave a message I will call you back.   Early on, Dan London  harassed them, and Saq Nadeem told me he was ignoring him.  I said, “No, please, get all the contact information you can.” But he didn’t.  Dan London would disappear, then get nuts again. He’d post all over the country on Craigslist that I had a puppy mill, that I took dogs from animal shelters to resell,  that I harassed people rehoming dogs (only the puppy mills—you can tell who they are) but worse  I abused dogs and  he told people to call Paradise4Paws and have them fire me.  I didn’t know this was going on. He could have harassed me directly, but  chose to not, and  one day, after the first of the year, Saq fired me because the manager wanted to. He didn’t know why, but she told me she was getting death threats.  Over not being able to sell your puppies? Because someone told you  I was a dog abuser?

These people are all over the country, and if they see it in the internet—it must be true.Why do they do it? Small dicks.  Because they can. They obviously get a vicarious thrill upsetting…women.  this is akin to domestic abuse..but if you can’t locate the abuser, yu can’t do anything.

At some point, this moron will slip up, and I will get a phone #, but as for now, this  is a guy, and this is what guys do.

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Why Pet Industry ‘Professionals’ Can’t Find Groomers

July 8, 2016
You'd be lucky to find a pet groomer who can still do a classic Poodle trim.

You’d be lucky to find a pet groomer who can still do a classic Poodle trim.

I had another demoralizing experience a few weeks ago.  I guess what made it worse was that I was hoping  for  a better experience.

I’ve been looking for  part-time work because, where I work now, they can’t get me enough work.  We are working out  the ‘bugs in the system’, because  originally, they didn’t want to pay me to  groom dogs that were getting ‘just baths’.  To most groomers, it is never ‘just a bath’,  and we make money on the dogs we don’t clip, but that is not what this is about.

The kennel owner has been training dogs for over  decade, and  although she provides  dog daycare,  she is one of the few that does not run huge packs of dogs, and knows that most  dogs coming  into her business really need more training.

She told me that she knew nothing about grooming,  and didn’t even know how to bathe a dog, but that her groomer was overwhelmed—-booked at least  two weeks out (doing about 8 dogs a day), and she needed more help.   She was even thinking of quitting. The kennel owner was having a terrible time finding a groomer.  She called all the grooming schools, and people weren’t showing up for interviews, or would groom for a day and not show up again.

Her  set up was ok.  She had adequate dryers and tables, and a good tub.  She showed me her appointments,  and was, indeed, booked two weeks out.   I asked what she was charging for a small dog. She told m $45.  I said, “That is  pretty low, and you really can’t raise your prices over 10%.”  She was not averse to raising prices—or so she told me.  In fact, she wanted  to  open a school for  dog daycare providers, and asked me  if I had eve trained anyone to groom.  I told her I had, but you can’t train a person to have an aesthetic eye, and that’s the problem with  for profit  vocational schools. She, again,  told me she knew nothing about grooming, but felt she had to start looking for  people to train.   I told her I could come in on Wednesday, and to start me with  six dogs and we’d see how it goes.  The kennel was  a bit less than 30 miles from where I live, so it was nice that I could bring my dogs.

A dog i groomed when I worked (frifly) for Pet Supplies Plus, The dog's owner was over joyed, but I got fired for wearing a scarf.

A dog I groomed when I worked (briefly) for Pet Supplies Plus. The dog’s owner was over joyed, but I got fired for wearing a scarf.

In any case, I showed up  at 8:00a.m., and the other groomer was already there and grooming.  She had the computer print -out of our appointments, and I saw I had  eight (not six)  dogs.  I thought that was a bit much, and the other groomer thought so, too, but, as she pointed out to me, the owner and kennel manager decided this. The other groomer always told them no more than  six and they always overbooked her.  I  asked about  the shampoo, as the owner told the groomer always  diluted shampoo first thing. Well, not exactly.  Making it up as I went wasn’t he most irritating thing.  Not being able to regulate the water tempeture was  the most irritating.  I do like to  have everything ready at the start of the day,but there were other irritations.

The other groomer had been at this job for 10 years.  I asked her why she hadn’t suggested raising prices, and she said she had, but some people refused  an increase, so the owner let them get away with the old  price—a price that hadn’t gone up in at least five years, and was low even then.  In fact, their whole fee schedule made no sense. A small dog,  full grooming, was $45, but a ‘bath & touch up was …$40?  a Siberian Husky was $45—and that is really just a bath and blow-out, but a Golden Retrieve was $35 +  $15 for the nail trim. A nail trim takes  less than  five minutes, but a Golden Retrieve bath, blow out, and  neatening will take at least as long as any small dog that needs scissoring, so….?  Yes, the groomer said, but  the kennel manager & owner—who do not do her job, told her  she wanted too much.  I knew I would have to ask for 60% to take this job.

Now, I am getting the lay of the land, and I am called down stairs to talk to a client.  The new client were referred by a relative who has their Golden Retrieve shaved, and they want their Golden Retrieve shaved like that. The  ‘new’dog is 11-years-old, and never has had a professional bath, let alone  had a clipper taken to it.  Not good.  I said to these people, “I have to be honest with you.  I am not sure I can do this, and were he my dog, I would not. It is a matter of integrity for me to tell you he will not be cooler, he will not shed less, and it will not look good.  If he’s not used to the vibration of the clipper, he might not let  me do this.”  They looked at each other and then to me, and, yes, they wanted this  11-year-old dog shaved because they liked the way the other dog looked.

So much stress.  The reception area was crowded with other  clients, so there was no sense addressing  clipper alopecia, and the  business owner’s  husband, who was at the reception desk,  did not say anything.  One of the kennel staff had to carry the dog upstairs to the grooming area (later, I heard the owner say the dog  does stairs at home, so they didn”t understand what the problem was.  What the problem was…was a scared dog).  I had to get more cooperative dogs started, so it was about noon before I could start this old dog.   He was actually in good shape, but he had no idea what was happening.  I  needed someone to hold the dog on the table, as he would not stand.  The other groomer had to text  kennel staff (there is no intercom), and a guy comes up and tells us he’s on lunch break.  Huh? So why  not send someone NOT on break?  About 20 minutes later a girl  comes up,  and I get the dog out of a kennel and have to ask her to lift the dog and hold the dog up while I do nails, sanitary, and get some hair off.  Then she  held the dog up in the tub for me (where, by the way, we never got hot water as we could not regulate the temperature), then helped me get the dog into a crate to dry.  So this dog (mind you, at the most, a $60 fee in most places, and the  business owner is charging  $50) is a two person job. The kennel is losing money on this dog.  I asked the girl to return in about 20 minutes so we can finish the dog.  Meanwhile, the kennel manager came up to ask how I am doing and if anyone is ready to go home.  I ask her to send someone up to help with this old dog, who will not stand for grooming.  After  10 minutes, the other groomer texts downstairs—again, and  about 20 minutes after that, a young man comes up.  I ask him to get the dog, and he starts futzing around with a kennel leash, so I get the dog, ask him to  put the dog on the table and hold the dog up while I shave the dog. While he’s holding the dog for me, he actually texts someone.

The other groomer  uses a very long blade on the other Golden, because the dog has clipper alopecia, and now has a very soft, sparse, fuzzy coat.  The long blade is not doing it for this dog, so I use a shorter blade. It looks decent, but not good.  Choppy.   Meanwhile, the other groomer tells me she actually likes grooming, she is just sick of these people. She is very disrespected.  They have not raised prices, they’ve  taken her dustpan and they don’t have a shop-vac.  Our garbage cans are way too small, and she feels she has  options to  get a job with less stress.  I tell her I can’t return unless they pay a higher  per centage, but I also asked her how often she sees the kennel owner, as the kennel owner has not come up to talk to  me or given me any paperwork.

I am finished with my  eight dogs about 2:30.  I went to reception to  tell them I am finished. The owner is in the training hall with the kennel manager and her husband.  She smiles at me but doesn’t say anything, and leaves out another door with a dog.  The husband sits down at the front desk and starts  rifling through  a drawer.  I say, “You know, Katy didn’t give me any paperwork.”

He hesitates, and finally  says, “Yes, well, we are  parting company. We didn’t like some of the things that went on here today.”  Interesting. Nobody came upstairs to say anything to me.  Except the kennel manager to ask how I was doing, and I said, “I am a bit overwhelmed.”  Several years back, I  took a job where I was told I would get seven dogs a day, but the bather would bathe my dogs.  That never happened due to  the dynamics of the shop.  Within  two weeks of my starting, a groomer who had been at the shop over  22 years came in one day and took all her stuff—-quitting, but never said anything to management…and suddenly I had nine dogs to groom a day.  I told the practice manager it was too much, and she told me to do my best. Then, I was getting  ten and 11 dogs a day, and I continued to tell her I could not do a good job on that many dogs.  I worked for about eight weeks, from 8:00 until  often after  4:30 p.m.  One day, she calls me over to tell me she has to let me go—she is getting too many complaints!  But  give me just seven dogs, and have the bather bathe my dogs?  Not happening.

So what didn’t the  owner’s husband not like? That I tried to dissuade the people with the Golden from getting the dog’s hair cut!  “Now, I know that Goldens are not supposed to be shaved, but…”   he says. It’s a money thing.  I was—again—in a no-win situation.”That dog was 11 years old!  it was a matter of integrity to  suggest they not do  this.  Did they like the way the dog looked?”  “I don’t know,” he replied.

What pisses me off was that  his wife—the kennel owner—didn’t have the integrity to tell the owners of the dog this was not ethical, and she didn’t have the integrity to talk to me about it, although she had all day. She had her husband—a person I had never met…do it.  Yet, she is going to bring integrity and professionalism  to pet services.  And she wonders why she can’t find a groomer.

We had an unpleasant email exchange, where she accused me of doing a bad job on purpose, and also claimed I cut the dog & she had to pay the veterinary bill & refund the grooming fee.  She actually never saw the dog.  she also told me  the other groomer was quitting because of an injury.  clearly, the other groomer needs a reference, and  won’t tell the owner the truth.

Here’s what another groomer blogged about, recently: https://poodlequeen.wordpress.com/2016/04/14/where-have-all-the-groomers-gone/

I can’t imagine how  someone who has never  even groomed their own dog  thinks  they will  just be able to hire a groomer, with no thought about  equipment,  how long a grooming takes, or what  a fair fee for a job is…but this is the direction  my industry is heading.

Where do I get Good Dog Grooming Instructions?

June 10, 2016
Purebred Bedlington. another breed with such a small gene pool, with genetic health issues, that the puppy mills have generally ignored.

Purebred Bedlington.

I am on a number of Facebook feeds aimed at  dog groomers.  Novice groomers, who have either been trained by vocational schools or by the major pet chains, are always  posting that they have a (name a breed) coming in, and they have never groomed one. What should they do?  My gut reaction is to tell the dog owner they never have groomed their breed.  Then, what often happens is that the groomer does a horrible job because she  either doesn’t have the sense to look up  information on-line and/or her scissoring really IS generic. It makes all of us groomers look like we have no integrity, and integrity is so important.

I was  ‘lucky’ to start grooming dogs as a teenager, when  everyone involved in the grooming industry was a groomer showing dogs, or training for competition.  Competition means  setting goals and being judged by your peers.  Thus, there were plenty of  people to learn from.  Charlie Praeger, who originated the Groom-Rite brand (the first portable tables and stand dog  hair dryers) taught my boss how to broom Bedlington Terriers.  I  then went to work for a woman whose mother (Edith Tisch) raised Bedlingtons , and sent HER to Jack Funk to learn Bedlingtons.  This was a coincidence, and  from  that experience, I determined that Bedlingtons Terriers were probably not my breed.  However, I learned to groom Bedlingtons and met other terrier  exhibitors and learned the nuances of the other terrier breeds.  I  worked for Airedale and Soft -coated Wheaten Terrier breeder Jocelyn Slatin,  and, in the early 1970s,  many of our  grooming clients came from over 30 miles away because they didn’t want their Airedales  looking like Miniature Schnauzers.  One  of my clients gave me a ‘Terrier Type” (magazine) filled with photos of Scotties. another gave me a grooming chart for Wheatens.  I managed to collect a lot of grooming information from the parent clubs, and I observed exhibitors  preparing their dogs for competition at dog shows.  By watching breed judging I saw what exhibitors saw as their best.  After judging, I’d ask  exhibitors for tips on grooming their breeds.   There are  several  good grooming books available.  Everyone should have a copy of Melissa ver Plank’s , Notes From the Grooming Table, as it can be very helpful if you have a general  idea in your mind’s eye, but  just don’t know how to get there. I also have a copy of Eileen Geeson’s Ultimate Dog Grooming.  This is generally a good book, but we have so many better tools now than when she wrote the book, and  she  uses a pin brush where most of us would use a slicker.  The  best thing about this book is that is  gives information on a lot of rare breeds.

In the past several years, I’ve had my integrity questioned by  groomers with a lot less  experience than I have, and by dog owners and business owners who seem to think that if I don’t automatically assume  the  pet owner wants the dog as short as possible (i.e.: shaved), I am not giving  good value.  I find this particularly true regarding  Pomeranians and designer dogs.  Many of these people have  gone to a pet store chain for grooming and gotten back a shaved dog (even though the dog was not matted), and I’ve had to explain that if they want this, I will do it, but that I was taught to  do what is best for the dog.

What follows are some links from  parent club websites.  Actually,  all the information is rudimentary.  It’s best to be mentored by fanciers who really love their breeds.

Grooming

http://www.lagottous.com/Grooming (not much specific info here….but maybe for the best!)

http://www.bedlingtonamerica.com/grooming/index.htm

http://www.puliclub.org/GroomingGuide1993Bowley.pdf

Don’t Make Her Look Like Anything (or, the ‘Puppy Trim’)

April 1, 2016

Jennie, a Soft-coated Wheaten Terrier, needed more than a bath.

When I learned to groom dogs, in the late 1960’s, virtually every dog that came into a grooming shop was a Poodle.  Most of the other breeds that were popular at the time (Miniature Schnauzers, Cocker Spaniels, Yorkies) went back to their breeders for grooming.  Or, if the shop was owned by a hobby breeder or dog show handler, we saw those breeds.

It was so rare to see a badly matted dog when I started grooming, because  the breeders made it very clear to pet lovers  what they had to do, how often the dog would need professional grooming, and there  was  no other option, You  did what you had to do.

When did things change?  Well,  hobby breeders assumed that everyone buying a pet had integrity, and, if you  sold a dog as a pet, it would not be bred.  It just took a few unethical people who wanted to ‘make their investment back’, and  that’s how it started.  These pet breeders did not consider themselves breeders ( they still don’t) and did not pay any of that knowledge forward.  They did not give  housebreaking, feeding, or grooming instructions.

It took  probably another 20 years or so before ethical hobby breeders started selling pets either on co-ownership of with a contract stipulating that the pet was to be neutered–or at least not bred.  This is why you don’t see the  more rare breeds in shelters or  pet shops:  the breeders hold them close.  With many breeds, you will never see an ad for puppies for sale anywhere. So, how do you find them?  Through the  breed parent clubs.  You have to network.  & this is why, after the Obamas got Bo, their Portuguese Water Dog, the market wasn’t inundated with Porties.  The breeders made sure that nobody who wasn’t concerned about the future of the breed got a breedable dog.

When I started grooming, there were no  Soft-coated Wheaten Terriers, Bichons, or Shih Tzu.  No Cavalier King Charles Spaniels , no cockapoos, no Doodles.  By the time I had been grooming over 20 years, these were the dominant dogs in my grooming shop…and it got to the point that I rarely saw a purebred Poodle.  I bought a client base from a groomer who had a reputation for  grooming  drape coated dogs and Wheatens, and at  one time, I had over 40  clients with Wheatens.  I had maybe  two clients who wanted their Wheatens to look like Wheatens, but most didn’t like the forelock.  They didn’t want  their  dogs to look like the breed they were.

Why did these people get Wheatens?  They didn’t want a poodle, because they heard they were too high strung.  However, they didn’t know enough about dogs, and to  think that a Wheaten would be less high strung  (meaning nervous, hyper active, noisy), was, to me, just  bizarre.  The  the other factors were that Wheaton were  not too big, not too small, and didn’t shed.

Jennie, after a hair vut. Sh's a Soft-coated Wheaten, would yu know it?

Jennie, after a hair cut. She’s a Soft-coated Wheaten, would you know it?

Dog groomers  know that the only official  puppy trim is for the Poodle. Everything else is basically cut off hair.  No style…unless the groomer decides to make it a style.    This (photo on the left)  is my default puppy trim.  Depending on how large the dog is (as I want to keep everything in proportion), and what kind of shape the dog’s hair is in (because  people ask for this haircut because they don’t want to brush the dog), I will  use a #4 on the body, and a #0 on the legs.  I always try to make the legs a bit longer so the dog does not look shaved.  When it comes to the head, I will set the length with an ‘A’ attachment, and scissor it shorter, often using a thinning shears to blend and make the  dog look more natural.  I  generally only lightly scissor the tail,and I never leave a skirt.  When we groomers started out,  every  dog that was not a poodle got a sort of  cocker spaniel trim, with the  ‘saddle’ (most of the body) trimmed short, with a long skirt.  I can’t think of any trim more impractical than leaving a skirt on a dog that is not going to be brushed until the next time we see it. But….as an apprentice groomer,  I dematted a lot of dogs with skirts. Why?  The grooming shop owners—the main groomers, weren’t doing the dematting. WE were.  Then, their clients got used to it, and of course they liked it. Then, when dogs were to badly matted, many groomers started leaving ‘false skirts’—where the chest was hollowed out, and there was long hair on the sides.  Another  stupid idea….because the short hairs  wove into the long hairs. That skirt, no matter how ‘false’, was always a mess.  Your client wants the skirt? Fine. Tell them to either brush the dog, or the dog has to come in once a week for bath & brush out.  I used to let them go for 2 weeks, but I found that the dog was  too messed up and matted after that long an interval. Would Jennie (on the left) look better with  longer hair on her legs?  Yes, she would.  However, her owner has  MS, and  he has to hire a dog walker to help him, as he is mostly paralyzed. So, I did the practical thing, and at least she’s not shaved.

The California Girl

January 8, 2016

I come from long lived people.
Well, not my mother’s father.  He died in his fifties of kidney disease, years before there was dialysis, or transplants.  I still don’t understand how healthy people suddenly get a malady, but I know it happens.  I believe that with my grandfather, he was probably exposed to solvents, because he was a metal recycler.  But who knows.

My mother died of lung cancer  in her mid forties. No mystery there.  She had smoked for  about 30 years.

My father’s father died  of leukemia in his mid seventies.  However, my grandmother lived into her early nineties, or so I believe.  My father cut her off for nastiness, and she never bothered to maintain a relationship with any of her grandchildren.  Her son, my father, is now  89.

Back on my mother’s side, her mother, my grandmother, lived into her mid nineties, even  surviving a bout of late onset breast cancer (in her  late eighties).  He sister also lived to her late eighties, although she chose to be an invalid for the last  twenty or so years of her life.  She really didn’t want to move or have physical therapy.  She just wanted to watch TV.

I mention all of this because I am now in my sixties, and I lost a dear friend just over a year ago, also in her early sixties. It happened so fast, and she knew it would.

Ch. Scenario Razzle Dazzle, JC as a young dog

Ch. Scenario Razzle Dazzle, JC as a young dog

We had met about  fifteen years earlier at the International Dog Show in Chicago—one of the last benched shows. I  was at the bench, with Dazzle, my Saluki, whom his breeder bemusedly told me I could show.  Janie also had a Saluki.  She was not showing  her dog, but we talked a little, and she  gave me her number and told me to call her if I wanted to get together.

I blogged about her last year.  I never thought she’d get her dog under control, as he was  quite lag and exuberant.  I don’t think Janie was even  five feet tall.  She had  grown up in California,  was a nurse, and had come to the Chicago area  because her husband had gotten a job.  Fred was her second husband.  She had married young, had a daughter, and the first husband ended up in jail.

Janie had had another  Saluki, Zephyr, and  she was just enchanted by the breed.  I am not sure how she found the breeder of the third and fourth Salukis (they were never healthy…never gained weight, and never got along), but  she was always trying to find a veterinarian who could find out  why  they never thrived.  I felt so bad for her, when first Reggie died.  She had

Reggie Wondergem, doing the scent articles at an obedience trial.

Reggie Wondergem, doing the scent articles at an obedience trial.

worked with him, to engage his brain, as well as to title him (he was probably the only Saluki attaining a U.D. in the last decade), then Khan, then Ivory.  But she planned next to get  a Saluki  from both obedience and conformation lines, and she got Ari.

Janie did dog boarding in her house, and some grooming as well.  She took on some tough cases: poorly bred  puppy mill dogs that people had bought or rescued.  She really educated herself about dog behavior, and helped a lot of her clients, and made a decent living.  I really admired her and how she ran her business and kept learning about dogs.  That’s what we had in common.  At one point, before we really knew each other,we were thinking of going into business together, but she didn’t trust the people I was buying the business from, and I understood. It was a stressful time for us, but we  got through it.

We had other interests.  Investing, lure coursing.  We both commiserated about trying to refinance our homes( being  independent contractors). Even though she had enough money to pay off her mortgage, no bank would lend to her because both she and her husband were self-employed.  Go figure (especially when they were financing people who clearly weren’t creditable!).

When she was diagnosed with lung cancer, I couldn’t believe it.  She hadn’t smoked in 30 years.   Nor could I believe she was having such a hard time getting treated.  Apparently, she was stage  four when she was diagnosed.  I wondered how that could be, that she had no symptoms for so long, then suddenly a small cough.  In less than six months, she was gone. She knew she might have a stroke, from the  medicines she was taking, and she did,and I am horrified that her last week on earth was so frightening.

Janie was  very disgusted with  the political system, and  has thinking of moving to Canada. As it was, her husband wanted to move back to California, and he did.

Janie did not have a funeral.  She was not religious.   I believe she was cremated, but she had so many friends.  They all asked about her when I  saw them at our dog training club.  I miss her very much. U guess that is the true memorial.

 

It’s Only Dog Hair

January 1, 2016
The trim is a 'Town and Country'. I wanted to do a classic 'Dutch', but the owner was a retired groomer , herself, and this was what she wanted. Note the balance, that her pants are not 'falling off'.

The trim is a ‘Town and Country’. I wanted to do a classic ‘Dutch’, but the owner was a retired groomer , herself, and this was what she wanted. Note the balance, that her pants are not ‘falling off’.

Saul Bellow wrote a book that  became a best seller, called “The Adventures of Augie March.” It’s about a working class Jewish kid trying to make his way in the world.  He has no education, gets involved with seedy individuals, and tries a lot of jobs. One of the jobs is as a dog bather for dog groomers.  I believe the book takes place in the early part of the last century.  All the dogs were poodles.  He  is ambivalent about the job.

Being a dog groomer, I never forget that part of the book, because I work for a lot of businesses owned by non-dog groomers…or  people who have had any experience in  the pet industry, like ever working in a kennel or assisting a groomer or veterinarian, and they think they are doing me a favor by hiring dog bathers.

Unless I train the bather, what I get is some kid with no  aspirations  to make an actual living, who thinks he loves dogs, but clearly doesn’t like the job task, who slows me down and usually does a half-assed job,  At my most recent job,  due partly to lack of proper equipment, they even  re-matted the dogs while drying them. Why?  Because my managers really didn’t care  whether these guys acted with integrity or not….and they were not brushing out most of the dogs.

I’ve written before about how non-dog groomers, or people whose only experience with dogs was actually in dog grooming school (“because they loved dogs”) are running businesses offering dog grooming, This was the case of one of my most recent jobs.  One of the guys who is a manager actually told me his parents ran a commercial breeding kennel (what we know as a puppy mill).  Yes, he has his own personal dogs whom he adores….but you  have a desensitization when you think it is ok to breed pets as livestock.  The other manager was trained by a very well known groomer, and is a very good scissor artist.    However, neither guy has worked in as many places, for as many mentors as I have.  Nor will they get their hands wet.  They are excellent groomers and horrible managers.

So, you couple these excellent groomers/horrible managers, with an investor/owner who really doesn’t have a clue about who has integrity, or that it matters, and you get….a real communication disconnect about what is needed to  make the business run efficiently, and why integrity matters.

I came on because the managers  got married and went on a vacation, leaving no experienced groomer, but a lot of work.  Had they really cared, they would have done this in January or February, when business  is slow (lots of people don’t get their dogs groomed in the winter—cold is the excuse…), not September, but no matter.  The investor owner pleaded with me, I came on part-time, saw they had full time, told the owner that there would be a lot of complaints as the managers LEFT NO GROOMING INSTRUCTIONS ON ANY CLIENTS, and his  other groomer was too inexperienced.

We muddled through. The guys returned, and suddenly, the efficiencies I had instituted so we could get through the day were  ignored.  Matted dogs were, again, being sent for bathing, and, and WE were expected to demat these dogs (even though, when the owner hired me, he told me the dogs would be brushed out for me).  Dogs were not towel dried properly, and so they stayed wet forever.  But more, I was being treated like…a necessary evil.  The guys  didn’t work with us.  One ‘managed’ the front, the other would come in late &  be constantly taking breaks to talk on his cell phone, or go out for a smoke or whatever.

I come in at  8:00 a.m., ready to start work immediately, and I  generally work until we are finished.  One is constantly warning  me to NOT cut any hair on the face before the dog is bathed, and not cut off any hair on the legs.  They do not clean ears. They forget to clip toenails, they  decided that because too many dogs are   frantic and  scraping their nails on the tub grates of the drying table (frantic—yes…now why would that be?), we are to cut nails after the bath.  If we get blood on the dog, we will rewash it.

I was being paid a decent hourly wage, but not great. No tips, I was not allowed to  interact with clients.  We were demating too many long-haired dogs.  I told both the owner and the manager that we should be telling people, the interval between groomings is too long and we are stressing out your dog.  That’s tactful, isn’t it?  Nobody is blamed for not brushing their dog. We know it is not a matter of money…it is they just don’t know and nobody has told them.

But they—owner and manager— refuse. THEY are not doing the  work, we are.  Yes, one of the managers will help if  a dog is very  horribly matted, but for the most part, another groomer and I do the work.   It is tedious, and in the end, doesn’t solve the problem. It is not fair to the dog, but nobody but me cares.

The icing on the cake was Christmas week. We had been slow the two weeks before, and I had been taking days off because there wasn’t really enough work, and I knew my co-workers needed the pay.  But X-mas week, we were grooming 30+ dogs a day.

What the manager would do would put the name of the dog on the board, the time in and out, and the ‘instructions’, which, for the most part, was one word:  “Cut”.  Sometimes it would say “long trim”.  On one dog, ‘Joey’, it said ‘E’. E is a long, attachment blade.  It leaves the hair about 2 inches long.  So, I did our regular pattern, and suddenly, Carlos/manager walks into the room (his partner is talking on his cell phone), lots of yelling in Spanish:  “What did YOU do?  You cut off the topknot!  Didn’t you see it was long?” and  what ensued was Carlos telling me the owner wanted a big head, she complained that while he was gone, we made the dog look like a monkey, why didn’t I ask…and all I could think was, You mean, when you left on vacation  and there were no grooming instructions on any dog…? 

You really can’t guilt me when you  make a mistake.  I  am amused, but I don’t feel bad.  And you know what?  The owner  came, picked up the dog, said it looked great, and left. No complaints.

As an aside, this happened to me about  25 years ago. I was working in a shop, and I had instructions to scissor a Cocker Spaniel.  Ugh!  but I got the dog fluff dried and  did it, and my co-workers were telling me how great  the dog looked, and my boss came into the room and yelled, “You made  him a half an inch too short!”  At first, I thought he was joking, but he was  distressed because  he  KNEW the owner would complain.  Now really, do you think any of these owners know how long their dog’s hair is?  But sure enough, she  called (maid picked the dog up, of course…) and  complained.  I told him I thought   it was a good time for me to tell him I was joining Peace Corps and would be leaving in  a month.

What did me in  on my  current job was that, as busy as we were, trying to  be efficient, the manager, not caring,  sent a matted Doodle to be bathed.  The bather knew the dog was felted and should be shaved, but he does what he is told.  It took him over 1/2 hour to dry the dog, and I was wondering what was going on, as I had not  touched the dog before the bath.  He finally finished drying the dog, and I told him to put the dog on my table. The dog was a solid mat.  I looked at  the bather, and he rolled his eyes and said, “I know…”  So, I went to Carlos and said, “I’ll have to take a thinning shears, and I don’t think there will be that much left.  He’s really badly matted.” So, Carlos now  has heard the dog is badly matted from 2 people.  He said, “Just give the dog a sanitary trim, and we’ll brush over the top and send him home.”  I know why he said this.  It’s Christmas, they probably want to take pictures, and don’t want the dog shaved.  So, I do the sanitary and nails, and Carlos comes in  and starts brushing over the top  of this dog.  I  was not going to  do that.  It wouldn’t have done anything.   The dog was matted at the skin.  Brushing was not making the dog look better as it was already fluffed out.  I was thinking  of who all would be ready for me to  finish grooming, as there were  at least five wet dogs  back there, and suddenly Carlos barks, “You are one of the  most annoying people.  I am not paying you to stand around, just leave!”

I almost laughed, but I did smile, I said Ok, and left.  I had been working since  8:00 a.m. and it  was now 2:30.  He knows i don’t waste time, don’t go out for a smoke, don’t stand around.  If there is no dog to work on, I clean the place, as there is always dog hair all over.   Why would I waste time brushing a matted dog over  the top of its mats when it wasn’t going to look any different?  He  knows I don’t stand around or waste time.  But if that’s how it is, that’s how it is.  I  had gotten another  part-time job two weeks before.  I can start later in the morning, I do my own bathing, it’s not a frenzy, I can have a relationship with clients…and I get tips.  This is why  shops have trouble getting talented groomers.

 

Why I Joined a Kennel Club

December 10, 2015
This is a display of rosettes at the American Whippet Club Specialty , 2015

This is a display of rosettes at the American Whippet Club Specialty , 2015

When I was thinking of breeding and showing dogs, I became a member of a kennel club.   One of my employers had been a member of the Waukesha Kennel Club in Wisconsin, and it was from those club members that she learned to groom the terriers and  many breeds we saw in our shop.  In fact, she learned to groom Bedlingtons from Charlie Prager, who invented the first portable grooming table and fluff dryer (Groom-Rite).

For a long time, I was not active in a kennel club.  I was either working my own business or  in the process of a divorce, or in school. Then I was in Peace Corps, then  re-acclamating myself to life  in the USA.  I just didn’t have ‘time’.  And how much time would it have actually taken to be a club member?  Not much, really.  In fact, it would have helped with business networking.  This is really the best reason to be a member of an all-breed  dog club, for groomers and trainers. Hobby breeders sell puppies that need services.

However, I knew from being a club member (I was a member of the Goldcoast Kennel Club in Chicago until 1987…the club has since  folded),  many of the club members were not breeders. They were  fanciers who may have shown a dog in the past, or were hoping to show a dog, but they were not active breeders.  We were all members for the same reason:  to support the fancy. That is, support people breeding dogs for the betterment of their breeds.

Vern Price, of  Crown Jewel Dalmatians, did a lot to  make the club a success.  He  instituted a 50/50 drawing for cash, and pulling a member’s name out of a hat at every meeting for a cash prize.  He made sure the club offered both obedience and conformation classes.  Vern made sure there were prizes for every dog show class at  the annual all-breed show.  Whether you  liked or hated Vern,  he made sure the club functioned.

Dazzle, JC (Dazzle) Saluki, on the left, Bebop Whippet, on the right. Bred by hobby breeders for the betterment of their breeds.

Dazzle, JC (Dazzle) Saluki, on the left, Bebop Whippet, on the right. Bred by hobby breeders for the betterment of their breeds.

When Vern died, the club started to disintegrate, and there is no longer a Goldcoast Kennel Club.  In the Chicago area, there are still about a dozen all breed clubs, but hardly any has an active membership. Worse, though, is that the specialty clubs are folding due to lack of members.  Granted, most clubs  exist at all  for breeders to promote their breeding and support their breeds.  They  have done this by holding dog shows, paying for research into health and genetic problems their breeds have, holding grooming classes, and supporting  performance training and events (agility, barn hunt, schutshund, lure coursing, etc) to keep interest in their breeds—and  individuals  competing with their breeds, alive.  Actually, the  breed club I belong to, the Greater Chicago Whippet Club—has no breeder members!  We are all  pet and racing folks who want to  socialize with other sighthound fanciers!

Purebred Bedlington. another breed with such a small gene pool, with genetic health issues, that the puppy mills have generally ignored.

Purebred Bedlington. another breed with such a small gene pool, with genetic health issues, that the puppy mills have generally ignored.

What has been happening —and those of us who have been grooming for several decades know this—-is that the American Kennel Club, the holder of the stud books (that is, records of who got bred to who), is supporting commercial breeding of dogs in our state legislatures (and defending the right to commercially breed pet dogs), at the expense of the fancy (what purebred dog enthusiasts are called).  Many breeders have ‘aged out’ or died, or just got disgusted with the whole cultural milieu.  Their  children either  never became interested, or can’t afford to  breed dogs.  Few  people can, with the middle class actually being less than 49% or all households.  So that means than many wonderful breeds don’t have viable gene pools…and as for the popular breeds, your chances of buying a  well bred pup without being on a waiting list is slim to none.  Of course, many of us are willing to take mature dogs, but how about our clients?  So, if they want a dog of a breed, their only option  is buying commercial breeders.

Why should dog  groomers be concerned? You might think this does not matter because  you haven’t gotten a new client with a purebred dog in several years (unless you  breed your own business).  Indeed, I  work in an elite section  of the Chicago area, and  all we are seeing is designer dogs.  It’s shocking  how many people have paid so much money for these mixed breed dogs…and virtually all of them have genetic health issues, because the people breeding dogs for the market really don’t care.  Also, by the time these pet owners learn that their  dogs will need a pricey health intervention (repair of liver shunt, removal of cataracts, fixing luxated patellas)….the breeder will be gone.  This is not to say  this  does not happen in purebreds—as it does, and these mixes are not pariah dogs, but mixes of purebreds.  But I do know that members of the American Miniature Schnauzer Club virtually eliminated congenital juvenile cataracts in their members bloodlines by paying for research , test breeding, and putting in the time and heartache.

If we don’t support hobby breeders, and let our  grooming clients know there is a difference, we  won’t have a grooming industry in about 10 years…unless you’re happy with shaving down dogs.

We must work together on this.  I urge you to network, and find a dog club you can work with.

It Really is Because We’re ….Girls….

September 18, 2015

Junior high school is a  really awkward time for  kids…but particularly girls.  Your hormones are  making your body change radically.  You get your period (how dramatic is that), and your intellect is maturing.  I went through a really ugly ducking stage, and kids were really mean.  Where I went to school, there was a  cool clique, and they were the worst, but I sucked it up and made it through (I also had a lot of counseling, as  I had a lot of stress and depression I could not define (hormones?), although it was mostly at home with parents and sibs).  That was over 40 years ago, and now those mean people are my ‘friends’ on Facebook.  Whatever. We’ve all matured.

I lived and lived, and although, in the dog grooming industry there is a lot of  pettiness and drama  (due mostly to immature personalities and introverts),  I never felt it was an issue until about 10 years ago.  I had closed a my business, which wasn’t losing money, but wasn’t making money, either, and I thought I could  do better. Of course, I have mixed feelings about not sticking it out another year, but the last year was flat  due a combination of  die-off of older, very steady dogs, and the impacts of 9/11 and Enron, as well as very high energy costs, rumors of the economic bubble  which came to fruition a year after I closed the business (for those who don’t quite remember, Lehman Brothers collapsed  due to them  having too much unsecured debt, which included those bundles of chopped up mortgages, and the resulting credit freeze, and the end of the Bush, jr tenure…)

In any case, by that time my  industry had started to change. As  video tapes  were replaced by CDs (and now, downloads!!!), purebred dogs were replaced by designer dogs, and retailers  saw that  big bucks could be made from  people seeking pet products…and suddenly, the businesses I  could possibly work for were not managed by dog groomers or trainers, but by  retail managers who really didn’t know that much about dogs.  Worse,  although it was not my work or skills that bothered them,  it appears it was my confidence.

When I worked for Best Friends Pet Care,  initially, thought is was me….but other female employees told me it was not me…it was the manager, Bruce Blaine.   In fact, a contract trainer, upon hearing I took the job, told my friend, “I would not want to be caught alone in the building with him.”  I should have taken that to heart.   I complained to the regional manager, and she came out to observer him, and talk to him several times…and every time he retaliated by bullying us girls. Some just quit, but I was making a lot of money, and I felt if I could avoid him, I’d be ok. The thing is…he went out of his way to bully me.  Finally, I was offered a ‘job’ elsewhere (it turned out to be  lie—but those people are out of business now, so no matter…), and I quit.  Several years later, I learned Best Friends was sold, he was demoted to kennel staff, and moved to another location—but he was not fired.  I don’t know why he was not fired.

A contract worker  who confirmed this with me told me that in HER contract, she  specifically had it stated that Bruce was not allowed to talk to her.  So… why would so many credible people not be taken seriously?  Is it really because we don’t have penises?

I also learned that Bruce  said he fired me.  That’s what the new managers told me.  I corrected them, and told them why I quit, but the damage was done.  The guy with the dick has much more credibility than a girl.

There are several major employers in our area begging for groomers.  They post on Craigslist every day, and on many of the  pages groomers check for work.  A human resources consultant  had me for a meeting and asked me why they have so much trouble finding groomers.  I told her that  at least three-quarters of those jobs don’t really exist.  They just want applicants waiting in case  some girl makes an excuse about her kid and  doesn’t show up, or she dares to tell a client her dog has a painful ear infection, so they fire her, or…my very favorite:  having you sign a bunch of papers about the rules, then having a manager tell you to break a rule (like, say, a dog coming in for grooming that doesn’t have proof of  inoculations), and  firing you for breaking the rule—even though they told you to break it.  That’s legal. It’s legal to lie to you about how much you will be paid, too.  They probably do it to guys, but since over  70% of groomers are  GIRLS , it happens to girls more often.

It’s true, and that’s why we are being told to lean in.  Men  speak with authority, and  it’s easy for them to become managers because men (and even women) like  take charge kind of people. They don’t want a woman to be bossy, but it’s ok for  man to be an asshole.  Last year  I worked for a woman who appointed weak women to manage, so she could manipulate them, and she  hired a male architect because he talked a good game, and he ripped her off royally.  Several people told her that (including men), but she  didn’t want to believe a guy she had paid and trusted had taken advantage of her.

Several women told me to just swallow this.  It happens, this is how it is in the industry, get used to it.  We women make it worse for ourselves because we are dog trainers and used to being in charge.  Men are threatened by us.  Right—and so they  have made it impossible for me to even be interviewed, yet they are still begging for women to make money for them.

That’s what it comes down to, in my industry. They don’t have the skills themselves. They don’t want to do physical labor, and  now, the industry has changed enough, that there are more mixed breed (excuse me–designer dogs like Doodles and Teddy Bears) coming in for grooming—or should we say SHAVING— than purebreds…so your TALENT isn’t really needed any more.   They can get a grooming school graduate who never even groomed or trained her own dog to work for a lower  per centage or hourly wage…and if she dare balks….there’s another one waiting.   I am sure this is true in many industries.  The  girls don’t remember feminism, or the push for  women’s rights….that was  40 years ago!    They will always think the problem is themselves.  This is true in so many industries, and so many workplaces.

 

 

The Coat Change…and matting

August 27, 2015
This is a Maltese I groomed in a puppy trim. They do not grow like this .naturally. they need haircuts.

This is a Maltese I groomed in a puppy trim. They do not grow like this .naturally. they need haircuts.

Any groomer who has been grooming for any length of time has seen it.  It is the cute, fluffy  puppy that the owners bought—usually on impulse—because it is cute and fluffy.  I always ask the new owners if the person who sold or gave them this dog showed them how to brush it.  I tell them the coat is very fine now, but when the dog gets to be about  six months old, more or less, they are going to wake up one morning and the dog will be matted.  It’s a given.  They often want me to give the dog a haircut just because they think the dog needs one.

Why  will the dog mat?  COAT CHANGE: the fine puppy coat will start to become stronger, thicker adult coat.  The puppy coat is very dry,and the cuticle of the hair will be open….and that’s how it starts. The static electricity of living, the cuticle of the hair being open, ‘locking’ into other hair cuticles and closing…. With many Afghan Hounds, you could see the adult coat at the roots of the puppy coat:  the puppy fuzz at the ends of a stronger, thicker shaft adult silk coat.  With some dogs, they suddenly lose a lot of hair—almost like a skin disease, and the new coat grows in.   It happens when the dog reaches sexual maturity (so, if the dog was neutered before reaching sexual maturity, you really don’t know what you are going to end up with—-but usually a blend of puppy  and adult coat).

What causes the matting?  Again….dirt, moisture,  and static electricity.  I cover this in my blog on  getting to a ‘specials’ (show ) coat,  People who want their dogs to have dramatic coats are willing to work through this.  unfortunately,  most pet owners try bargaining, anger, and denial before they reach acceptance.

Purebred Bedlington. another breed with such a small gene pool, with genetic health issues, that the puppy mills have generally ignored.

Purebred Bedlington. another breed with such a small gene pool, with genetic health issues, that the puppy mills have generally ignored.

Some breeds, like Bedlington Terriers , Maltese, and Afghan Hounds, have very thin skin.  It is really  easy to cut or tear the skin if mats are too close or tight.  Years ago, I had a large number of Old English Sheepdog clients who rarely ever made it out of the coat change. The breeders in my area would keep the pups in coat as long as they could, and when the coat started changing, shaved the dogs down and didn’t show the dogs until they were over  two-years-old (it takes that long to grow a coat back to it’s full length in a large breed).

 

So, how do we deal with this?  When puppy owners come in for first grooms, I usually do a sanitary trim and ‘neaten’ the coat, but I also show them how to brush the dog with a slicker, metal comb, and  my curved rake.  I tell them to enjoy the coat while they can, because the dog will change coats and mat overnight. I tell them the mats will start behind and under the ears, under the chin, between the front legs and in the armpits (another  excellent reason to avoid harnesses…which will cause friction against the  hair and static), around the tail, and at the wrists (hocks and pasterns) and spread from these areas.  I tell them if they just brush over the top and don’t get down to the skin—or wash the dog without brushing it, I will definitely have to shave  the dog. Brush layer by layer….from the skin out….  and I show them what I mean.  I advise against using a thinning shears at this stage, because the short hairs weave into the long hairs (also the reason you get  matted ears when you just  neaten the tips), but to  put the dog on a schedule and if they do nothing else, brush and comb through these specific trouble spots…and if the hair flies around  or they need to wash their hands after brushing the dog…the dog needs a bath.  I advise DILUTING the dog shampoo in a shampoo or dishwashing liquid bottle, and brushing the shampoo through the hair—particularly the trouble spots.

I also tell my clients to develop a system, and start brushing the dog in the same place every time. I  do the back of the back leg and work my way up…I do all ‘four sides’ of the dog’s leg, then the body from the belly/chest up, the front leg, then the other side, and the head last.  About 50% of my clients do this, and have also purchased portable grooming tables or taught their dogs to lie down for brushing.  The rest get what I can possibly do to make the dog look good and not hurt the dog…

More and more, however, people are getting Cotons  or designer dogs like ‘Cavashons’  (Cavalier/Bishon mix),  ‘Shipoos’ (shih Tzu/Poodle mix) or Teddy Bears (a Bichon/Shih Tzu mix),  which have mixes of coat textures.  Good luck to us all.  I’ve had dogs mat up immediately after brushing due to the dryness of the coat and static electricity.  The owners  complain if I clip the dog too short, but won’t do what needs to be done, and sometimes keeping the coat mat free is impossible.  This is not YOUR fault…it is the breeder’s fault.  It is a matter of integrity.

When I started grooming as a teenager, I briefly worked for a hobby breeder, Fredric Mark Alderman, who owned Dynasty Afghan Hounds.  He did not sell an Afghan Hound to a novice owner until they had spent a day grooming with him.  He didn’t want to hear that  you had no idea how long it would take, how much equipment you’d need, or how often it would need to be done.   If, at the end of the day, you decided an Afghan Hound was not for you, no harm, no foul.  His dogs were not going to end up resold, abandoned, or in puppy mills.  From him, I learned it is the responsibility of the breeder to show pet buyers basic coat care.  For some reason (due to the negative marketing by some of the well-intentioned pet rescuers), people think that if they buy a dog from someone who just bred their pet—they didn’t  enrich an evil breeder. I  was  ‘raised’ by fanciers, who led me to believe the owner of the mommy dog—whether that owner  had 1 breedable bitch or 100, was  the BREEDER  and responsible for  screening  puppy buyers and  showing them how to maintain the dog’s coat at home.  They should be held responsible for the dogs they breed, or they are as bad as any  pet store or puppy mill…and I feel the same way about rescues and shelters that don’t address coat care.  I offer to  work with rescue volunteers  placing dog that need  professional grooming.

I realize many of us did not come into the profession  because we  were  fanciers.  I learned techniques and styling from  fanciers, and use what I leaned to  make those  ‘hybrid’ (mixed breed)  ‘designer dogs’ look as good as possible considering their owners  want what they want without putting in the effort.  In doing research, I found 2 national ‘Australian Labradoodle Clubs’ (neither posting coat care information on their websites: http://alaa-labradoodles.com/BreedStandard.html , http://www.australianlabradoodleclub.us/ no breed standard or care information),  A Goldendoodle national registry: http://www.goldendoodleassociation.com/standard.aspx, No Cavashon club ( well, can you call a commercial website for commercial breeders a club?), and in looking for information on Teddy Bears , I came across the maltipoo website, which mostly addresses behavior issues and had NOTHING about grooming. That said…..The Poodle Club of America says NOTHING about grooming at all on their website, and suggests contacting regional clubs for more info on the breed.  The American Shih Tzu club has  several pages on grooming:http://www.americanshihtzuclub.org/grooming_companion.  The American Maltese Association  does address grooming, but it is very general information and might not be that helpful:http://www.americanmaltese.org/service/general-maltese-information ;  the Bichon Frise Club of America has a very good site, with photos of grooming tools.

 

 

Dog Flu Hits Metro Chicago Hard.

May 15, 2015

Although you’d think we’ d be at the tail end of this epidemic, we  have been hit by  ‘dog flu’ since  the end of March.  Some of the kennels and  dog day-care businesses shut down, but most did not,  people are not going to dog parks (at least the ones who have actually known of a dog that  got the dog flu), but many still are.

Our  dog training club, Northshore Dog Training Club, one of the oldest in the country,  halted classes for 4 weeks, as our facility was closed for disinfecting.

The fear has  also affected dog groomers. while I tell my clients that they should really worry only if their dogs have a compromised immune system, I have enough clients  with  frail dogs that I’ve advised them to wait.

I do have 1 client whose dog got flu. he attends dog daycare  several days a week.  however, being a relatively healthy, young dog, he recovered quickly.

the dogs who’ve really suffered are the dogs in  shelters.  Obviously, they are all under stress, and  when one dog gets it, it  infects others quickly.

I will say this:  as I wrote about the American Whippet Club Specialty, there have been no reports of any of those dogs getting sick.  Obviously, being in  performance condition makes a difference.

We know some veterinarians are now getting the vaccine.  We also know that it is an evolving virus,  so the vaccine may not be effective in several months.

It’s silent  spring.