Archive for the ‘book review’ Category

Move on? Resist? What’s the Plan? 2017

February 24, 2017
Me (Robyn) at Vic Falls

Me (Robyn) at Vic Falls

When I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Malawi, in 1992,  the country was  undergoing a big shift. There had been a president, who had named himself  life president, and had served, at that time, 26 years:  Hastings ‘Kamuzu’ Banda.  He was s dictator:   he terrorized the country.  He was supported by the Europeans & the USA because he was NOT a communist, and  he  supported apartheid in South Africa. About the only good thing he did for the Malawians was build a  decent road infrastructure.  The school and health care systems were virtually nonexistent.  It was a country run by elites. who went for medical care out of the country.  Malawi was socially stratified:  if you had a decent job and were literate, most likely you employed an illiterate servant to clean your house & probably cook for you. There was no way to improve your lot unless you were (or are) particularly ingenious.

Of course, I worked with elites.  They  two I worked with were honest, and had integrity.  Things were the way they were.  Pick your battles. but I explained to them that  democracy did not bring good government, but representational government.

And here we are, over 30 years later, and our  representational electorate has elected  a guy who lied, who had no plan, who  disrespects women, minorities, the handicapped…. people who are not white Europeans.  It will be interesting to see how  his Orthodox Jewish son-in-law works with the white supremacist  Bannon, who is a close advisor.  Really interesting….but I think they are sell-outs. I have some friends who I really lost respect for.  It’s one thing to think your friends are  uninformed—but to see they voted for the white guy because they believed ‘fake news’ (what we used to call lies….as ‘toxic assets’ were liabilities) and just didn’t like  or trust Hillary.   Was it because she was a woman?  Doesn’t matter—she actually got the popular vote. She won!  But due to the political mumbo jumbo of the electoral college, these former friends who voted for Trump think—really, that HE won!  It’s like saying 5-3=10!  So this is the new reality.

I fear for the environment.  Even the Clean Air & Clean Water acts were signed by Nixon—a Republican.  It is proven that when you offer free birth control and family planning information—the unplanned birth rate goers down, and the community prospers….but our rulers  really have a mindset that women should be punished for having sex—the punishment being raising  children, and this will lead to a surplus in labor.  Our economy can no longer absorb uneducated people—as it can’t absorb the educated ones! What other explanation can you  come up with for  defunding  Planned Parenthood or making abortion illegal?  It’s not like the people who make these laws are fostering or adopting orphans or kids in the child care system.

I also think  the Democratic Congress made the banking industry more accountable. Trump thinks it is too much regulation.  Education would  fix this, as kids would understand more, but with DeVos, they have demonstrated that  making sure kids learn math & science is not a priority.  it’s up to us…in the states…to work this out.

So, as a result of all this, I am much more in touch with my elected officials.  I let them know how I feel about everything.

But  are there  citizen movements emerging to develop strategies to  change it all back….or…?

While   I have big issues with the Affordable Care Act, the problem is with insurance companies, and it is time for Single Payer.  If Trump wasn’t flitting off to Florida every week, there’d be plenty  of money  for  people of all ages to buy into Medicare. You wouldn’t have to—you could still pay for private insurance if you really believe you’d get a better deal….but, having had to  deal with  health insurance a lot recently (Bursitis, and I was bitten by a dog), I can tell you, the government couldn’t make a bigger mess out of what things should cost & how hospitals get paid than the insurance companies have!

If we are going to ‘resist’ and make things better, we must educate ourselves, so we have talking points.  I want everyone who wants to make a difference get  4 books and read them.

  1.  The First is, “Lies My Teacher Told me, ” by James Loewen  You really have to understand American History, first, or you will be ‘condemned to repeat it.  It’s outrageous, what we learned in school and  what we think is real;

2. “Charlie Wilson’s War,”  by  George Crile.  Aaron Sorkin made a pretty funny movie by manipulating facts.  All of what Charlie did, and why,  is sort of ‘funny’ in an ironic way.  It’s important to understands what he did and who influenced him, as he changed history.  You will learn  that he actually armed what became the Taliban, ISIS, and all the others who hate  freedom;

3.  You ought to read a book on economic history.  “The Big Short,” by Michael Lewis, again, was a funny movie.  Not so funny  is that is our history, and he documents it and writes about it in a way you can understand.  Bottom line:  because we are  an innumerate nation, and so few of our schools teach  people real math and budgeting, our neighbors trusted the banks—even thought the numbers were right in front of them. We all lost, big time.

If this seems too convoluted, get a copy of Robert Reich’s book, “Aftershock.”  We could have saved ourselves, but Hillary didn’t make it engaging enough (that, and the Russians and FBI director Comey put the final nails in her coffin);

4.  Finally, how do we actually  get the hearts & minds?  You have to read Malcolm Gladwell’s book, “The Tipping Point.”  We’re not going anywhere in a hurry unless we know the dynamics of social change.  In simple language,  this book tells us how it’s done.

Book Review: Charlie Wilson’s War, by George Crile.

June 3, 2016

The movie (created by people I would call the ‘dream team’:   director Mike Nichols and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, starring Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts), came out in 2007… about 9 years ago.  This is the Wikipedia link to the review:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Wilson%27s_War

I came across the book (which I didn’t know existed) while traveling.  Crile was an amazing writer.  This is an absurd, almost unbelievable story. It’s actually a story about how ‘democracy’ works.

Do you remember where you were in the late 1980s?  I was in undergraduate school, working part-time grooming dogs,  and modeling for artists.  I had had a roommate who had volunteered with the Sandinistas in Nicaragua.  Related to that, I had an FBI file.  That’s another story, which I blogged about previously: https://disparateinterests.wordpress.com/2009/11/20/how-i-got-my-fbi-file/ .

The reason  my roommate volunteered to work for the Sandinistas was because of our ‘covert’ was in Nicaragua.  President Reagan wanted to  help the ‘contras’—a really ragtag group of’ anti-communists’ with no real strategy to govern the country, fight communism.  Unfortunately for them, in spite of  Reagan and the CIA pouring money into training and paying soldiers, they  really weren’t getting support of the Nicaraguans.   They did not exist at all, but were a contrivance.  Apparently, not only were there  several other political parties besides the  Sandinistas, the Nicaraguans did not fear communism or socialism the way we Americans had been led to.

This only matters because the war was not ‘covert’:  the news media knew of it, as did many Americans, who  pressured Congress to cut off funding.  We all knew Reagan was not a deep thinker, and he allowed key players  in the Republican Party to set policy.  What this has to do with the story of Charlie Wilson, and the war in Afghanistan (also covert—and a secret to us), is that, at one point,  Oliver North/the Reagan Administration asked the CIA and the Appropriations committee to hide money for the Contras in funds earmarked for the mujahedeen in Afghanistan.  :”Wait!” you  shout.  “The mujahedeen?  Aren’t they the people  waging  jihad against us now?  Haven’t they been since…?”  Yep, You got it.

The movie  was written  as a comedy.  Charlie Wilson was a playboy congressman from Texas, whose constituents didn’t ask much from him.  Having served in the navy, and grown up during the cold war, he was  strongly anti-communist.  On the advice of a vivacious socialite, Joanne Herring, who had met the  president of Pakistan ( Zia ul-Haq…who had his predecessor assassinate…), Charlie, who sat on the Appropriations Committee in  the House of Representatives,  got money  appropriated for arms for people in  Afghanistan fighting Russians/Soviets.  The Russians were in Afghanistan to prop up a  socialist government.  As we believed at the time—and it could have possibly been true—according to the domino theory:  if the USSR got a foothold in  south Asia, they could dominate the world.  The reality was—and is—that Afghanistan —as a country—is a contrivance.  It is a geographic parcel of land within a border.  It will probably never be a country with a viable economy.  It is a failed state without ever really being a state.

Who writes our history?  Is it what we get in primary school history books?  Is it journalists who write news  reports and turn them into books?  No matter. At the time the CIA was  buying and providing arms for the Afghan rebels, I was a student working part time.  What I DO remember is that very suddenly, the Soviet Union fell into chaos, and the Berlin wall came down.  I don’t think many Americans understood why this happened.  All we really knew of the Soviet Union was that it was a dictatorship with no press freedom, and only of consequence to us insofar as their influence on other countries.  Crile  gives us a better understanding  of what really happened.

We have to  understand what we  did in the rest of the world.  While the do-gooders took to the Afghanis, who were not united in any way, and have proven to not be unitable, what the do-gooders did—with out tax money, was ignore their human rights record, ignore how they treated  each other—let alone women, and gave them the power to  terrorize us after they finished with the Russians.  As I write this, in early 2016, we have Syrian refugees fleeing the middle East, and a bunch of right-wing politicians calling them all terrorists…meanwhile ignoring the fact that  they supported the cause of all this.

Worse, the front-runner, Hillary Clinton,  the former Secretary of State, continued to allow the Pakistanis to hold us hostage, along with President Obama, so we could kill off Osama bin Ladin and temporarily slow down jihad leaders.  We are not going to stop how foreign aid is doled out unless we  organize for a radical shift in leadership (which is another reason I support Bernie Sanders). The   countries receiving it hire lobbyists, and the  companies manufacturing weapons also have a huge stake in  continuing the status quo.

Book Review: Without Sin, by Spencer Klaw

March 18, 2016

I became interested in the Oneida community when I was in high school, in the late 1960s’s.   I  read a  popular book on sex, and  the physician who wrote it suggested, for the inexperienced, they find members of the Oneida community to initiate them. Of course, they no longer existed.  However,  it got me curious  about the community, as I was interested in Utopian communities.

The Oneidans were a ‘intentional community’ practicing  Christian communalism.  They were organized as a commune, shared labor and  learned different tasks.  They were led by the eccentric , John Humphrey Noyes, who had, in retrospect, a very convoluted Christian view.   They were concentrated around Putney and Oneida , New York.

The most interesting thing about them, I think, was their conscious feminism and advocacy for women. Marriage was allowed, but monogamy was discouraged.  But more, since in the 1860s, there really wasn’t much  birth control available, men were encouraged to practice sexual continence  (not ejaculate), and, as a result, the community controlled its fertility, and there were very few unplanned pregnancies.

Using the writings and letters of Noyes, as well as other members, Klaw has put together a very good description and history  of the community.  They are remembered for ‘free love’, but, in fact,  sex was relatively discreet.  Indeed, the leader, Noyes, seems to have been having more sex than anyone.  That the community  existed for over 30 year (from 1848) and became quite wealthy due to their work and enterprises, is really the remarkable thing.    This is attributed to both the shared labor aspect, as well as the equality of women in  learning job tasks.

They became quite wealthy,and their  best known enterprises were Coates & Clark thread, and Oneida Silverware.   But this was after they had been established for several decades. At the disbanding of the community, these enterprises became corporations.

Why did the  community fold if things were  going so well?  Several reasons: 1.  John Humphrey  Noyes was the undisputed leader, and his word was law.    He was  ultimately threatened with  being charged with sexual crimes and fled the country, moving to Canada.  He never was charged, but leadership after he left becamse hotly disputed.; 2.  It was a religious  commune, and  they discouraged people not fully committed to Christ from joining ; 3.  They  would not work with other communes; 4.  When Noyes left, new leadership  emerged and  members started thinking   about whether they wanted traditional marriage or  how they had been living, and the younger people chose traditional marriage.

In any case, the  commune ‘devolved’ to a corporation, and was in decline for a couple of years until John Noyes son, Pierpont, was able to take the reins  of the silverware company, which exists in some form to this day.

This is a well researched book, and would be  of interest to anyone interested in communes.

 

I always like to include the wikipedia  post because  it is concise and  generally  well documented. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oneida_Community

Book Reviews: “The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill”:, and “Life, Love, and Elephants”

October 23, 2015

I love books about animal behavior, and I have  two to recommend to anyone interested  in caring for animals, or who just wants to learn more about animal behavior.

The first is, “The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill,”  by Mark Bittner.  Bittner is  (or was) a sort of lost soul/hippie, who  had a hard time finding his way in life. He spent time as a street musician, and lived  off friends and the kindness of strangers, as well as by doing odd jobs, for years, in San Francisco. He lucked into a job as  ‘caretaker’ of a house that he knew would ultimately be sold.  Having a lot of free time on his hands, he noticed a flock of conures, and started feeling them.  From feeding them, he started observing their  behavior, and the dynamics of the flock.  He’s very observant, and an excellent writer.  He realized that the conures are not native birds (to San Francisco), and started learning all he could about them, by going to his local library, bookstores, and seeking out experts.  This is  a great book for any bird lover, and especially for anyone thinking of buying a pet bird.

I had  known about the Sheldrick Trust (of Kenya) because I had seen a feature on their work with orphan animals on the  TV show, 60 Minutes.  This book is an autobiography by Dame  Daphne Sheldrick, who was married to David Sheldrick (who died young of a heart attack).  Her family had  originally  been farmers in South Africa, and were enticed to Kenya.  Yes, her family  were settlers.  It’s a rough life.  However, early on, they were committed to environmental conservation.  She and her first husband went to Tsavo to manage the ‘conservancy’ and address poaching, One thing leads to another,  and she  developed a system to  save orphaned elephants and rhinos.  She saved other orphaned animals, too.  When her husband died suddenly, she was really at a loss, but the Kenyans working in the Wildlife Department, as well as the founders of the African Wildlife Foundation, recognized that she had  worked unpaid along side David for much of her adult life. Kenya needed her.  The Sheldrick WildlifeTrust  not only  nurtures orphaned animals, but also provides environmental education  to the students in communities around the parks.

Both of these books are excellent histories/environmental studies for  animal lovers. The first  book partly addresses how the pet industry impacts wildlife.  The second book addresses the economic as well as social aspects of environmental conservation.

 

Book Reviews: Over My Head, by Claudia L. Osborn

October 2, 2015

Long story short:  in the late 1980’s, physician Claudia Osborn was taking a bike ride with a friend through her neighborhood, when she was hit by a car and sustained massive head trauma.

On the outside, she looked healed and perfectly normal, but it was obvious to people close to her that she was not healed, and could no longer work as a physician.  her  biggest problem was short-term memory.  She could drive a car, but could never remember where she was going, Indeed, she could not follow through on a lot of activities unless she made a list.

She was lucky to find a program that treated people with head trauma. Although she lived in Michigan with a friend,  she was able to  attend a specialized program that attempted to retrain  people how to think and manage their thought processes, based in New York City.

Her long-term memory was still ok, and she still knew  medicine, and she wanted to practice medicine, but she also realized that  she needed a lot more recovery time and  practice  thinking and managing her life. This is what this book is about.

The idea that she  could even write this book, and explain  her healing process as well as she did, is a miracle.  What is more astonishing to me is that she  could not only pay for this specialized treatment (I guess, as a physician, she had excellent insurance), she could also  afford to fly back & forth between Michigan and  New York City for months.

I am sure strides have been made in treating head trauma in the past 30 years, but  recovery is, I am sure, still a slow process.  Gabby Giffords, who was shot in the head, can tell us about that.

This book is very well written, and i would suggest it to anyone  who cares about a person who  has had a stroke or any traumatic brain injury.

Book Review: The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer

August 21, 2015
a colorized version of G.P. Murdock's ethnic map of Africa

a colorized version of G.P. Murdock’s ethnic map of Africa

As many readers of this blog know, I have traveled in Africa several times. I was Peace Corps in Malawi in 1992.  Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world. Even though it has been the recipient of much foreign aid (from USAID, the European Community, and even medical personnel from Egypt), the government policy has been to NOT have it trickle down to the populace.  Who knows where it went. Consultants?    When I served in Peace Corps, literacy hovered around 35%.  Only 15% of households had access to radios. The incident of AIDS was 25–90% depending on how close you lived to a paved road.  Malawi is still very much a country of small holders:  small  farmers.  Many have been encouraged to  plant the cash crop of tobacco (hey—the Chinese still smoke like chimneys, as do the Eastern Europeans and Middle Easterners…), but then, due to quality issues, the  government  parastatal buying the tobacco to resell  will only buy a small portion of what small holders were selling…and you can not eat tobacco.

With access to the internet (via mobile phones, originally brought to Malawi by the Malaysians), more people are getting more information. However, in addition to AIDS, malaria is still a huge  problem, as is TB. So many Malawians do NOT live near paved roads that it is difficult to  get  information (so most of what you get is via rumor) or access to health care.  Primary school is free, but often teachers are merely high school graduates themselves, and don’t own any books for the subjects they are teaching.  You have to pay fees to go to high school.

Knowing this,  this is why  Kamkwamba’s story is so remarkable.  This book was written by  one of those kids who didn’t get to go to high school because his family could not afford school fees.  He feared for his future, of course, but  he was a curious kid, and thankfully, there was a free library in his town.  All the books were donated.

Farming is the type of job  where there are weeks of intense work preparing the soil and planting….and then you wait and hope and pray.  Malawi has  always suffered droughts, made worse in recent decades due to deforestation. This  story takes place  just after the turn of the century.  While Malawi was no longer rules by Kamuzu Banda, it turned out that the devil they didn’t know was worse, as Muluzi, the president at the time, was in total denial about  people starving due to crop failure due to the drought.  Kamkwamba does a brilliant job of describing how bad things were at this time.  It’s humbling.

He also describes the culture of the Chewa people very well.  The gist of the story is that he had a lot of time on his hands, as he wasn’t in school, so he borrowed books and taught himself physics.  He  found scrap parts, and built a windmill so his family could have electricity.  He becomes  famous in his village (one reason is that he charges villagers cell phones!),  Malawian journalists write about him, one thing leads to another, and  his education (having been interrupted for five years) is sponsored and he is asked to give a TED talk.  Very happy ending.

This is a marvelous book, available on Amazon (I’ve included a link), and I’d recommend it to anyone who wants to learn about Africa, resilience, perseverance, or who wants to make a difference and help others like Kamkwamba.  When I first became curious about Africa, the classic, “The African Child,” by Camara Laye, was recommended, and that is  a sort of idealized view of African childhood.  This book is better.  It would make a great gift for any child, and be a great addition to any school library.

I’ve included links for the African Library Project and Zambian Children’s Fund.  In the last century, I used to send books via ‘M’ bag, to schools in Malawi.  I sent several tons of books, but the U S Postal Service stopped this as it was too expensive (they had to pay to store containers until they were full). It you send books to  either organization, they  will send them in containers and make sure they are delivered.  I send the books UPS, because I know from experience that the USPS often is rough with boxes and empty boxes have been delivered.  The Africans  really need books on science, business, public health, first aid,  and teachers editions.  They can also use maps.

Who knows how many kids like Kamkwamba there are, who are curious, but don’t have access to books?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?search=William+Kamkwamba&title=Special%3ASearch&fulltext=1

http://www.amazon.com/The-Boy-Who-Harnessed-Wind/dp/0803740808/ref=pd_sim_14_1/185-7381202-9985626?ie=UTF8&refRID=1JHS80E4ZQ1VAAS6G14J

http://www.africanlibraryproject.org/?gclid=CjwKEAjw9dWuBRDFs9mHv-C9_FkSJADo58iMa3PZxGrRVw6NNZQacpRvHv2_5RGkn2ON0jSGUM_TaxoCBKDw_wcB

http://www.zambianchildrensfund.org/

Movie Review:Love And Mercy—Foxes Minding the Henhouse

July 10, 2015

I’m not much of an audiophile.  there is so much noise in my life, I generally listen to NPR on the radio, and go for jazz.  However, I still enjoy the rock of my youth.  On my desert island playlist is Good Vibrations….  I’ll say that straight off.  Next thing I’ll say  is that I have been mentally  ill on and off. Mostly depression, but the fact is that I have Asperger’s Syndrome, and I  just  don’t fit anywhere.  I’m on the Wrong Planet.

Because I love Beach Boys music, and so many people told me they enjoyed this movie, I had to see it.  It’s a visually beautiful movie, taking place in southern California, and a story well scripted and edited.  The music is great, of course.   Paul Dano and John Cusack both  do  an excellent job of playing Brian Wilson young and old, in all his turmoil.

I don’t  think that most of us who enjoy Beach Boys music realized  Brian Wilson arranged so many of the hits we love.  He really is a genius.  However,  it’s hard to be an artist. It appears that his fellow band members had a different idea of what they wanted to do.  Coupled  with an abusive  father, and whatever stresses cause mental illness, he was really tortured for a very long time…  Psychotherapist Eugene Landy, who  somehow got  guardianship of  Wilson, also abused him more.

We in America are so trusting of care providers. We just assume they are altruistic and have your interests at heart.    I saw several psychiatrists and psychologists  as an adolescent.  They made a lot of money off my parents and really did no more than assure me I was not crazy.  When I was starting my college career, I was thinking of majoring in psychology (because I wanted some insight into how  people make decisions).  I had the  amazing luck to  get a ‘self-taught’ intro to psychology course  with a textbook written by James V. McConnell :  “Understanding Human Behavior” (http://www.nytimes.com/1990/04/12/obituaries/james-mcconnell-psychology-teacher-and-researcher-64.html), the genius (no joke—he got a MacArthur grant) worm biologist, who addressed the practice of psychology on humans.  He said, in a nutshell, that 1/3 of people who go to  psychologists/psychiatrists for  talk therapy get better, 1/3 stay the same, and 1/3 get worse.  It’s  essentially the dynamic between the patient and the  doctor.

Brian Wilson had the extreme misfortune to come under the control of Landy, who alienated him from his family even  further, and it was just by a stroke of luck that he met Melinda Ledbetter.  She had the integrity to  try to disentangle him.  Of course, this could have gone either way.

Mental illness is  sort of like diabetes in that  if you take care of yourself. are a bit introspective,  and avoid stress, you can  function in the  world…but it never really goes away.  And what is it? A chemical imbalance?  Thanks to Temple Grandin,  there is a lot less  ambiguity to  human psychology than there used to be.  However, the foxes are still in charge and , coupled with lawyers, they tend to keep us oddballs suppressed.
This is a sad story with a happy ending, and it  does a lot to show that not everyone who is mentally ill is schizophrenic.

Was Michael Burry on the ‘Wrong Planet’?

July 7, 2010

This  blog is kind of going to be all over the place.  I am addressing Aspergers Syndrome again and  how difficult it is  to connect with people.

We with Aspergers tend to be obsessive about our interests.  Mine was and has been dogs.    I learned a lot of breed standards.  I learned  a lot about the unique features of specific dog breeds, including disqualifying faults. Later, I became obsessive about learning about Africa (still a major interest).

Several years ago, when I had my own grooming business  away from my house, a prospective client called and started asking me questions. We had a bit of a discussion, & she said (I am not joking) , “You are so nice!  I’ve tried talking to other dog groomers and they are so rude!”  Guilty.  I am rude—or actually, direct–too.  I said to the woman, “We’re dog people, not people people.”

But you know, non-dog people  who don’t do the actual labor—the bosses who hire us—want people who are good with customers, not necessarily good groomers.  I wish I could put up a sign that says, “I have Aspergers. Please bear with me.”

I didn’t realize this until I read Tempel Grandin’s book, “Thinking in Pictures.” It was a good description of ME.

I majored in anthropology because I wanted to learn how normal humans behave.   A lot of good it did me!

Year passed.  Several months ago, a client who has a Ph.D. in psychology, and who has taught at the college level, asked me if I had ever checked out http://www.WrongPlanet.net   I hadn’t.  It’s a great site for information on Autism and Aspergers.  We may all be depressed, or frustrated, or anxious—but we are not psychotic or dimwitted.

Writer/former  trader Michael Lewis has recently published a book called The Big Short, and an excerpt was published in the April 2010 issue of Vanity Fair magazine.  In the article, he profiles Michael Burry.  Even if you are not  interested in financial trading, or the recent economic meltdown, if you want  a good read, you have to check this out.  In fact,  check out Michael Burry on Wikipedia and then check out the article.

Now, for all you people who  may not believe we are afflicted (if that is the word for a personality type) because we haven’t been specifically diagnosed by a psychologist…I want to remind you all that psychologists are not scientists. Their degrees are in the arts (M.A.—not M.S.)  They are the foxes watching the henhouse.  Like lawyers—they have arranged society in America—along with lawyers—to get credibility from politicians.  Many practicing psychologists—especially clinical psychologists—have serious mental/psychological disorders.  Because they are the ones in charge of the rules, it is very hard to out them.

As for psychiatrists….remember, they are M.D.s  first  They can prescribe drugs. They may not have an intense understanding of psychology or cultural anthropology & social dynamics.  For the most part, however, the drugs are developed by biochemists, not physicians. The  psychiatrists rely on the  marketing of the drug companies to  decide if a drug is effective.  Years ago, an internist had me try Prozac.  He didn’t promise anything.  He just told me that it had worked for many of his depressed patients.  He told me it might take several weeks to work.  In 3 days, it was like a curtain had been lifted.  No counseling. No mumbo-jumbo.  I didn’t spend thousands of dollars I didn’t have on sessions.  Just a seratonin re-uptake inhibitor.

So here’s Michael Burry  learning he has Aspergers.  Because of his Aspergers—and his fixation on learning, he became a billionaire.  He didn’t do anything  extraordinary.  He just used common sense and focused on what was happening.  His obsession happened to be the stock market.  And  that led him to  trading, and hedging, and the rest is history.